Why the Montessori Movable Alphabet is so important

Parents Can Help Kids Read by "Making Speech Visible," Says Noted Researcher

In her new book, research neuropsychologist Dr. Jeannine Herron offers a simple solution that may help the two-thirds of American fourth graders who cannot read proficiently.

A simple idea for helping kids learn to read.

Quote startJeannine is one of the few scientists who can translate complex research findings into effective instructional solutions for kids.Quote end

(PRWEB) October 07, 2011

Speech-to-print instruction for early reading is not a new idea in the world of teaching children. Maria Montessori was using this approach many years ago. But it took neuroscience to prove her right.

Enter Jeannine Herron, Ph.D.

In her new book, Making Speech Visible: How Constructing Words Can Help Children Organize Their Brains for Skillful Reading, research neuropsychologist Dr. Herron offers a simple solution that may help the two-thirds of American fourth graders who cannot read proficiently.

In her book, Dr. Herron explains that children first need to construct their own words before reading words someone else has constructed. Using the latest in brain-imaging research, case studies and simple tips, Dr. Herron leads educators and parents alike to a more effective way of starting children on the path to skilled reading.

According to G. Reid Lyon, Ph.D., former Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch within the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). "Jeannine is one of the few scientists who can translate complex research findings into effective instructional solutions for kids."

"Struggling readers," according to Herron, "activate their right brains to read, but skilled readers use the left brain. Speech-to-print instruction directs early reading to the left brain."

"Children learn to identify the sounds their mouths make when they say a word," she explains, "and then assemble letter tiles (included in the book) to construct the word. By speaking the word first and sounding it out, the child activates the left brain, where new crucial links to visual words need to take place."